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School of Law
1045 W. Maple St.
Robert A. Leflar Law Center
Waterman Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Phone: (479) 575-5601

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Students with Disabilities

§ 6-301. Determination of Disabilities.

For purposes of ascertaining whether a student is eligible for accommodations, either in the manner that courses are conducted or scheduled or in the examination of competency in such classes, the determination of whether a student has a disability within the meaning of the Americans with Disabilities Act, 42 U.S.C. §§ 12101-12213 and Section 504 of the 91Rehabilitation Act, 29 U.S.C. § 794(a), shall be made by the University’s Center for Educational Access (CEA).

February 18, 2005

Amended September 13, 2012

§ 6-302. Coordinator for Students with Disabilities.

The Dean will select an appropriately qualified Coordinator for Students with Disabilities. Such Coordinator will work with the CEA to develop and implement procedures to assure appropriate accommodations recommendations for law students with disabilities, with the understanding that decisions about recommended accommodations shall be determined by the Coordinator, working in conjunction with the CEA.

February 18, 2005

Amended September 13, 2012

§ 6-303. Essential Academic and Professional Skills.

These policies concerning students with disabilities are specifically required to be interpreted and applied consistently with the standards included in Part 7 of Chapter 3 of these policies.

March 3, 2006

§ 6-304. Dissemination of Policies.

The Dean’s office shall take steps to see that information concerning the Law School’s policies and procedures for students with disabilities be (a) included in Law School publications, including its web-site; (b) provided to students following their admission to Law School; and (c) included by faculty in their syllabi as appropriate. The Dean’s office shall also take steps to assist faculty, students, and staff in following ADA guidelines when scheduling law school events.

February 18, 2005

§ 6-305. Accommodations Concerning Examination Format.

The practice of law requires that lawyers know and apply various analytic skills and substantive knowledge in providing counsel and representation to clients. Law school professors evaluate their students learning and application of these skills by use of examinations that include multiple choice, essay, short answer, performance, and other problem-solving methods. The choice of examination format is made individually by each professor according to their learning goals and expectations for each course taught. The School of Law will not interfere with a professor’s expertise in determining the method by which a professor evaluates his or her students by requiring a professor to provide an individual accommodation for a student.

However, nothing prevents a professor from modifying the format of his or her examination for an entire class, as long as the modified format fulfills his or her evaluation goals in a particular course. That decision is left to the good judgment of the faculty member based on his or her educational goals for the specific course.

November 16, 2007

Part 7, of Chapter 3, which is referenced in Section in Section 6-303, provides:

To achieve the required professional competencies while a law student, students must be able either with or without accommodations to satisfactorily:

  1. Access, comprehend, and use legal educational and research materials, including legal information presented aurally
  2. Attend classes regularly and promptly
  3. Meet curricular and specific course requirements including the ability to comprehend and retain information presented in assigned materials, class presentations and discussions, and to participate in examinations and other evaluative processes
  4. Learn, retain and apply the law, rules, processes, values and responsibilities of the legal profession, and the professional skills generally regarded as necessary to effective and responsible participation in the legal profession
  5. Effectively manage time, including assigning appropriate priorities to tasks and commitments and completing work on time
  6. Work effectively both independently and with others
  7. Identify, logically analyze and independently research legal issues
  8. Identify, obtain and use relevant factual information
  9. Develop and assess alternative solutions to legal problems
  10. Develop coherent legal arguments in support of a particular position and effectively communicate them in oral and written presentations, and participate in civil discourse of disputed issues
  11. Develop intellectual, work, and personal habits consistent with the ethical obligations of the legal profession
  12. Recognize, respect, and adhere to standards of appropriate professional and personal conduct in their actions as a law student, law clerk, or student attorney

March 3, 2006

You can get more information from the University of Arkansas Center for Educational Access.

School of Law

1045 W. Maple St.
Robert A. Leflar Law Center
Waterman Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Phone: (479) 575-5601

Law School Directory

University of Arkansas School of Law